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Time Series Prediction With Deep Learning in Keras

Last Updated on September 13, 2019

Time Series prediction is a difficult problem both to frame and to address with machine learning.

In this post, you will discover how to develop neural network models for time series prediction in Python using the Keras deep learning library.

After reading this post you will know:

  • About the airline passengers univariate time series prediction problem.
  • How to phrase time series prediction as a regression problem and develop a neural network model for it.
  • How to frame time series prediction with a time lag and develop a neural network model for it.

Discover how to build models for multivariate and multi-step time series forecasting with LSTMs and more in my new book, with 25 step-by-step tutorials and full source code.

Let’s get started.

  • Updated Oct/2016: Replaced graphs with more accurate versions, commented on the limited performance of the first method.
  • Updated Mar/2017: Updated for Keras 2.0.2, TensorFlow 1.0.1 and Theano 0.9.0.
  • Updated Apr/2019: Updated the link to dataset.
  • Updated Sep/2019: Updated for Keras 2.2.5.

Problem Description

The problem we are going to look at in this post is the international airline passengers prediction problem.

This is a problem where given a year and a month, the task is to predict the number of international airline passengers in units of 1,000. The data ranges from January 1949 to December 1960 or 12 years, with 144 observations.

Below is a sample of the first few lines of the file.

“Month”,”Passengers”
“1949-01”,112
“1949-02”,118
“1949-03”,132
“1949-04”,129

“Month”,”Passengers”

“1949-01”,112

“1949-02”,118

“1949-03”,132

“1949-04”,129

We can load this dataset easily using the Pandas library. We are not interested in the date, given that each observation is separated by the same interval of one month. Therefore when we load the dataset we can exclude the first column.

Once loaded we can easily plot the whole dataset. The code to load and plot the dataset is listed below.

import pandas
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
dataset = pandas.read_csv(‘airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)
plt.plot(dataset)
plt.show()

import pandas

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

dataset = pandas.read_csv(‘airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)

plt.plot(dataset)

plt.show()

You can see an upward trend in the plot.

You can also see some periodicity to the dataset that probably corresponds to the northern hemisphere summer holiday period.

Plot of the Airline Passengers Dataset

Plot of the Airline Passengers Dataset

We are going to keep things simple and work with the data as-is.

Normally, it is a good idea to investigate various data preparation techniques to rescale the data and to make it stationary.

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Multilayer Perceptron Regression

We want to phrase the time series prediction problem as a regression problem.

That is, given the number of passengers (in units of thousands) this month, what is the number of passengers next month.

We can write a simple function to convert our single column of data into a two-column dataset. The first column containing this month’s (t) passenger count and the second column containing next month’s (t+1) passenger count, to be predicted.

Before we get started, let’s first import all of the functions and classes we intend to use. This assumes a working SciPy environment with the Keras deep learning library installed.

import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

import numpy

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

import pandas

from keras.models import Sequential

from keras.layers import Dense

We can also use the code from the previous section to load the dataset as a Pandas dataframe. We can then extract the NumPy array from the dataframe and convert the integer values to floating point values which are more suitable for modeling with a neural network.


# load the dataset
dataframe = pandas.read_csv(‘airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)
dataset = dataframe.values
dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32’)

# load the dataset

dataframe = pandas.read_csv(‘airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)

dataset = dataframe.values

dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32’)

After we model our data and estimate the skill of our model on the training dataset, we need to get an idea of the skill of the model on new unseen data. For a normal classification or regression problem we would do this using cross validation.

With time series data, the sequence of values is important. A simple method that we can use is to split the ordered dataset into train and test datasets. The code below calculates the index of the split point and separates the data into the training datasets with 67% of the observations that we can use to train our model, leaving the remaining 33% for testing the model.


# split into train and test sets
train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)
test_size = len(dataset) – train_size
train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]
print(len(train), len(test))

# split into train and test sets

train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)

test_size = len(dataset) – train_size

train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]

print(len(train), len(test))

Now we can define a function to create a new dataset as described above. The function takes two arguments, the dataset which is a NumPy array that we want to convert into a dataset and the look_back which is the number of previous time steps to use as input variables to predict the next time period, in this case, defaulted to 1.

This default will create a dataset where X is the number of passengers at a given time (t) and Y is the number of passengers at the next time (t + 1).

It can be configured and we will look at constructing a differently shaped dataset in the next section.


# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix
def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):
dataX, dataY = [], []
for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):
a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]
dataX.append(a)
dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])
return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix

def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):

dataX, dataY = [], []

for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):

a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]

dataX.append(a)

dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])

return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

Let’s take a look at the effect of this function on the first few rows of the dataset.

X Y
112 118
118 132
132 129
129 121
121 135

X Y

112 118

118 132

132 129

129 121

121 135

If you compare these first 5 rows to the original dataset sample listed in the previous section, you can see the X=t and Y=t+1 pattern in the numbers.

Let’s use this function to prepare the train and test datasets ready for modeling.


# reshape into X=t and Y=t+1
look_back = 1
trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)
testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)

# reshape into X=t and Y=t+1

look_back = 1

trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)

testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)

We can now fit a Multilayer Perceptron model to the training data.

We use a simple network with 1 input, 1 hidden layer with 8 neurons and an output layer. The model is fit using mean squared error, which if we take the square root gives us an error score in the units of the dataset.

I tried a few rough parameters and settled on the configuration below, but by no means is the network listed  optimized.


# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model
model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(8, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))
model.add(Dense(1))
model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)
model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=200, batch_size=2, verbose=2)

# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model

model = Sequential()

model.add(Dense(8, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))

model.add(Dense(1))

model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)

model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=200, batch_size=2, verbose=2)

Once the model is fit, we can estimate the performance of the model on the train and test datasets. This will give us a point of comparison for new models.


# Estimate model performance
trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)
print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))
testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)
print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))

# Estimate model performance

trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)

print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))

testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)

print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))

Finally, we can generate predictions using the model for both the train and test dataset to get a visual indication of the skill of the model.

Because of how the dataset was prepared, we must shift the predictions so that they aline on the x-axis with the original dataset. Once prepared, the data is plotted, showing the original dataset in blue, the predictions for the train dataset in green the predictions on the unseen test dataset in red.


# generate predictions for training
trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)
testPredict = model.predict(testX)
# shift train predictions for plotting
trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict
# shift test predictions for plotting
testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict
# plot baseline and predictions
plt.plot(dataset)
plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)
plt.plot(testPredictPlot)
plt.show()

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# generate predictions for training

trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)

testPredict = model.predict(testX)

# shift train predictions for plotting

trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict

# shift test predictions for plotting

testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict

# plot baseline and predictions

plt.plot(dataset)

plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)

plt.plot(testPredictPlot)

plt.show()

Tying this all together, the complete example is listed below.

# Multilayer Perceptron to Predict International Airline Passengers (t+1, given t, t-1, t-2)
import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from pandas import read_csv
import math
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix
def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):
dataX, dataY = [], []
for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):
a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]
dataX.append(a)
dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])
return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

# load the dataset
dataframe = read_csv(‘international-airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)
dataset = dataframe.values
dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32′)
# split into train and test sets
train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)
test_size = len(dataset) – train_size
train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]
# reshape dataset
look_back = 3
trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)
testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)
# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model
model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(12, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))
model.add(Dense(8, activation=’relu’))
model.add(Dense(1))
model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)
model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=400, batch_size=2, verbose=2)
# Estimate model performance
trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)
print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))
testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)
print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))
# generate predictions for training
trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)
testPredict = model.predict(testX)
# shift train predictions for plotting
trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict
# shift test predictions for plotting
testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict
# plot baseline and predictions
plt.plot(dataset)
plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)
plt.plot(testPredictPlot)
plt.show()

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# Multilayer Perceptron to Predict International Airline Passengers (t+1, given t, t-1, t-2)

import numpy

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

from pandas import read_csv

import math

from keras.models import Sequential

from keras.layers import Dense

 

# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix

def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):

dataX, dataY = [], []

for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):

a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]

dataX.append(a)

dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])

return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

 

# load the dataset

dataframe = read_csv(‘international-airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)

dataset = dataframe.values

dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32’)

# split into train and test sets

train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)

test_size = len(dataset) – train_size

train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]

# reshape dataset

look_back = 3

trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)

testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)

# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model

model = Sequential()

model.add(Dense(12, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))

model.add(Dense(8, activation=’relu’))

model.add(Dense(1))

model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)

model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=400, batch_size=2, verbose=2)

# Estimate model performance

trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)

print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))

testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)

print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))

# generate predictions for training

trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)

testPredict = model.predict(testX)

# shift train predictions for plotting

trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict

# shift test predictions for plotting

testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict

# plot baseline and predictions

plt.plot(dataset)

plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)

plt.plot(testPredictPlot)

plt.show()

Running the example reports model performance

Note: Your specific results may vary given the stochastic nature of the learning algorithm. Consider running the example a few times and compare the average performance.

Taking the square root of the performance estimates, we can see that the model has an average error of 23 passengers (in thousands) on the training dataset and 48 passengers (in thousands) on the test dataset.


Epoch 195/200
0s – loss: 535.3075
Epoch 196/200
0s – loss: 551.2694
Epoch 197/200
0s – loss: 543.7834
Epoch 198/200
0s – loss: 538.5886
Epoch 199/200
0s – loss: 539.1434
Epoch 200/200
0s – loss: 533.8347
Train Score: 531.71 MSE (23.06 RMSE)
Test Score: 2355.06 MSE (48.53 RMSE)

Epoch 195/200

0s – loss: 535.3075

Epoch 196/200

0s – loss: 551.2694

Epoch 197/200

0s – loss: 543.7834

Epoch 198/200

0s – loss: 538.5886

Epoch 199/200

0s – loss: 539.1434

Epoch 200/200

0s – loss: 533.8347

Train Score: 531.71 MSE (23.06 RMSE)

Test Score: 2355.06 MSE (48.53 RMSE)

From the plot, can see that the model did a pretty poor job of fitting both the training and the test datasets. It basically predicted the same input value as the output.

Naive Time Series Predictions With Neural Network

Naive Time Series Predictions With Neural Network
Blue=Whole Dataset, Green=Training, Red=Predictions

Multilayer Perceptron Using the Window Method

We can also phrase the problem so that multiple recent time steps can be used to make the prediction for the next time step.

This is called the window method, and the size of the window is a parameter that can be tuned for each problem.

For example, given the current time (t) we want to predict the value at the next time in the sequence (t + 1), we can use the current time (t) as well as the two prior times (t-1 and t-2).

When phrased as a regression problem the input variables are t-2, t-1, t and the output variable is t+1.

The create_dataset() function we wrote in the previous section allows us to create this formulation of the time series problem by increasing the look_back argument from 1 to 3.

A sample of the dataset with this formulation looks as follows:

X1 X2 X3 Y
112 118 132 129
118 132 129 121
132 129 121 135
129 121 135 148
121 135 148 148

X1 X2 X3 Y

112 118 132 129

118 132 129 121

132 129 121 135

129 121 135 148

121 135 148 148

We can re-run the example in the previous section with the larger window size. We will increase the network capacity to handle the additional information. The first hidden layer is increased to 14 neurons and a second hidden layer is added with 8 neurons. The number of epochs is also increased to 400.

The whole code listing with just the window size change is listed below for completeness.

# Multilayer Perceptron to Predict International Airline Passengers (t+1, given t, t-1, t-2)
import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from pandas import read_csv
import math
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix
def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):
dataX, dataY = [], []
for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):
a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]
dataX.append(a)
dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])
return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

# load the dataset
dataframe = read_csv(‘international-airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)
dataset = dataframe.values
dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32′)
# split into train and test sets
train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)
test_size = len(dataset) – train_size
train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]
# reshape dataset
look_back = 3
trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)
testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)
# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model
model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(12, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))
model.add(Dense(8, activation=’relu’))
model.add(Dense(1))
model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)
model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=400, batch_size=2, verbose=2)
# Estimate model performance
trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)
print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))
testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)
print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))
# generate predictions for training
trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)
testPredict = model.predict(testX)
# shift train predictions for plotting
trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict
# shift test predictions for plotting
testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)
testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan
testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict
# plot baseline and predictions
plt.plot(dataset)
plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)
plt.plot(testPredictPlot)
plt.show()

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# Multilayer Perceptron to Predict International Airline Passengers (t+1, given t, t-1, t-2)

import numpy

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

from pandas import read_csv

import math

from keras.models import Sequential

from keras.layers import Dense

 

# convert an array of values into a dataset matrix

def create_dataset(dataset, look_back=1):

dataX, dataY = [], []

for i in range(len(dataset)-look_back-1):

a = dataset[i:(i+look_back), 0]

dataX.append(a)

dataY.append(dataset[i + look_back, 0])

return numpy.array(dataX), numpy.array(dataY)

 

# load the dataset

dataframe = read_csv(‘international-airline-passengers.csv’, usecols=[1], engine=’python’)

dataset = dataframe.values

dataset = dataset.astype(‘float32’)

# split into train and test sets

train_size = int(len(dataset) * 0.67)

test_size = len(dataset) – train_size

train, test = dataset[0:train_size,:], dataset[train_size:len(dataset),:]

# reshape dataset

look_back = 3

trainX, trainY = create_dataset(train, look_back)

testX, testY = create_dataset(test, look_back)

# create and fit Multilayer Perceptron model

model = Sequential()

model.add(Dense(12, input_dim=look_back, activation=’relu’))

model.add(Dense(8, activation=’relu’))

model.add(Dense(1))

model.compile(loss=’mean_squared_error’, optimizer=’adam’)

model.fit(trainX, trainY, epochs=400, batch_size=2, verbose=2)

# Estimate model performance

trainScore = model.evaluate(trainX, trainY, verbose=0)

print(‘Train Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (trainScore, math.sqrt(trainScore)))

testScore = model.evaluate(testX, testY, verbose=0)

print(‘Test Score: %.2f MSE (%.2f RMSE)’ % (testScore, math.sqrt(testScore)))

# generate predictions for training

trainPredict = model.predict(trainX)

testPredict = model.predict(testX)

# shift train predictions for plotting

trainPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

trainPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

trainPredictPlot[look_back:len(trainPredict)+look_back, :] = trainPredict

# shift test predictions for plotting

testPredictPlot = numpy.empty_like(dataset)

testPredictPlot[:, :] = numpy.nan

testPredictPlot[len(trainPredict)+(look_back*2)+1:len(dataset)-1, :] = testPredict

# plot baseline and predictions

plt.plot(dataset)

plt.plot(trainPredictPlot)

plt.plot(testPredictPlot)

plt.show()

Running the example provides the following output.

Note: Your specific results may vary given the stochastic nature of the learning algorithm. Consider running the example a few times and compare the average performance.

Epoch 395/400
0s – loss: 485.3482
Epoch 396/400
0s – loss: 479.9485
Epoch 397/400
0s – loss: 497.2707
Epoch 398/400
0s – loss: 489.5670
Epoch 399/400
0s – loss: 490.8099
Epoch 400/400
0s – loss: 493.6544
Train Score: 564.03 MSE (23.75 RMSE)
Test Score: 2244.82 MSE (47.38 RMSE)

Epoch 395/400

0s – loss: 485.3482

Epoch 396/400

0s – loss: 479.9485

Epoch 397/400

0s – loss: 497.2707

Epoch 398/400

0s – loss: 489.5670

Epoch 399/400

0s – loss: 490.8099

Epoch 400/400

0s – loss: 493.6544

Train Score: 564.03 MSE (23.75 RMSE)

Test Score: 2244.82 MSE (47.38 RMSE)

We can see that the error was not significantly reduced compared to that of the previous section.

Looking at the graph, we can see more structure in the predictions.

Again, the window size and the network architecture were not tuned, this is just a demonstration of how to frame a prediction problem.

Taking the square root of the performance scores we can see the average error on the training dataset was 23 passengers (in thousands per month) and the average error on the unseen test set was 47 passengers (in thousands per month).

Window Method For Time Series Predictions With Neural Networks

Window Method For Time Series Predictions With Neural Networks
Blue=Whole Dataset, Green=Training, Red=Predictions

Summary

In this post, you discovered how to develop a neural network model for a time series prediction problem using the Keras deep learning library.

After working through this tutorial you now know:

  • About the international airline passenger prediction time series dataset.
  • How to frame time series prediction problems as a regression problems and develop a neural network model.
  • How use the window approach to frame a time series prediction problem and develop a neural network model.

Do you have any questions about time series prediction with neural networks or about this post?
Ask your question in the comments below and I will do my best to answer.

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